Discussion:
Putting The Homeless Problem into Perspective
(too old to reply)
Roedy Green
2008-12-16 06:46:03 UTC
Permalink
There are about 0.2 percent of the population homeless in the USA.

This is about 1 in 500 people.

The burden of caring for the homeless is embarrassingly light. It is
downright undetectable. There is no problem with money. The problem is
mean spirited people who enjoy punishing the homeless.

Further the costs of housing the homeless would be less than what we
do now locking them out in the rain like some besotted parents.
Politicians admit this.

In the entire USA there are about 600,000 homeless people. The cost of
feeding and housing the all of them for a year is $3.6 billion (not
counting the savings from getting them off the streets).

to put that in perspective:

The Iraq war costs $12 billion a month.

the cost of Medicare D is $43 billion a year.

Mr Madoff stole $50 billion.

Banks got a $750 billion bailout.

There are trillions (thousands of billions) of dollars "missing" in
the Pentagon accounting ledgers.


"Behold, this was the iniquity of thy sister Sodom, pride, fullness of
bread, and abundance of idleness was in her and in her daughters,
neither did she strengthen the hand of the poor and needy."
~ Ezekiel 16:49
--
Roedy Green Canadian Mind Products
http://mindprod.com
PM Steven Harper is fixated on the costs of implementing Kyoto, estimated as high as 1% of GDP.
However, he refuses to consider the costs of not implementing Kyoto which the
famous economist Nicholas Stern estimated at 5 to 20% of GDP
dangdangdoodle
2008-12-16 12:04:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Roedy Green
There are about 0.2 percent of the population homeless in the USA.
This is about 1 in 500 people.
The burden of caring for the homeless is embarrassingly light. It is
downright undetectable. There is no problem with money. The problem is
mean spirited people who enjoy punishing the homeless.
The system is fubar.


-- the dang

"To those who would tear the world down, we will defeat you." Obama
Stephen Green
2008-12-16 12:23:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by dangdangdoodle
Post by Roedy Green
There are about 0.2 percent of the population homeless in the USA.
This is about 1 in 500 people.
The burden of caring for the homeless is embarrassingly light. It is
downright undetectable. There is no problem with money. The problem is
mean spirited people who enjoy punishing the homeless.
The system is fubar.
-- the dang
"To those who would tear the world down, we will defeat you." Obama
Another socialist failure.
Stephen Green
2008-12-16 12:20:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Roedy Green
There are about 0.2 percent of the population homeless in the USA.
This is about 1 in 500 people.
The burden of caring for the homeless is embarrassingly light. It is
downright undetectable. There is no problem with money. The problem is
mean spirited people who enjoy punishing the homeless.
Further the costs of housing the homeless would be less than what we
do now locking them out in the rain like some besotted parents.
Politicians admit this.
In the entire USA there are about 600,000 homeless people. The cost of
feeding and housing the all of them for a year is $3.6 billion (not
counting the savings from getting them off the streets).
The Iraq war costs $12 billion a month.
the cost of Medicare D is $43 billion a year.
Mr Madoff stole $50 billion.
Banks got a $750 billion bailout.
There are trillions (thousands of billions) of dollars "missing" in
the Pentagon accounting ledgers.
"Behold, this was the iniquity of thy sister Sodom, pride, fullness of
bread, and abundance of idleness was in her and in her daughters,
neither did she strengthen the hand of the poor and needy."
~ Ezekiel 16:49
Given than 50% are suffering from some sort of mental illness and that
they should be in some sort of supervised living envoronment, what do
you do with the other 50% whose are generally fit to work?

Problem is even though in the long run providing accommodation may save
money, in the short run given the magnitude of the issue, no simple
solutions are available. Society has thrown billions of dollars to this
problem and yet nothing concrete has been evident.

Some one said some time ago that the best thing is the status quo, since
that guarentees a bunch of jobs for the NGO's forever. The NGO's are all
socialists who have not come up with a solution.
klunk
2008-12-16 15:09:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Stephen Green
Post by Roedy Green
There are about 0.2 percent of the population homeless in the USA.
This is about 1 in 500 people.
The burden of caring for the homeless is embarrassingly light. It is
downright undetectable. There is no problem with money. The problem is
mean spirited people who enjoy punishing the homeless.
Further the costs of housing the homeless would be less than what we
do now locking them out in the rain like some besotted parents.
Politicians admit this.
In the entire USA there are about 600,000 homeless people. The cost of
feeding and housing the all of them for a year is $3.6 billion (not
counting the savings from getting them off the streets).
The Iraq war costs $12 billion a month.
the cost of Medicare D is $43 billion a year.
Mr Madoff stole $50 billion. Banks got a $750 billion bailout.
There are trillions (thousands of billions) of dollars "missing" in
the Pentagon accounting ledgers.
"Behold, this was the iniquity of thy sister Sodom, pride, fullness of
bread, and abundance of idleness was in her and in her daughters,
neither did she strengthen the hand of the poor and needy."
~ Ezekiel 16:49
Given than 50% are suffering from some sort of mental illness and that
they should be in some sort of supervised living envoronment, what do you
do with the other 50% whose are generally fit to work?
Problem is even though in the long run providing accommodation may save
money, in the short run given the magnitude of the issue, no simple
solutions are available. Society has thrown billions of dollars to this
problem and yet nothing concrete has been evident.
Some one said some time ago that the best thing is the status quo, since
that guarentees a bunch of jobs for the NGO's forever. The NGO's are all
socialists who have not come up with a solution.
well then... the solution is actually simpler than you might think... and we
can kill two birds with one stone... figuratively speaking of course.... if
we stop pissing away stupid amounts of money in these insane oil and
international meddling wars, the we dramatically reduce the number of
veterans whom actually comprise a significant proportion of homeless
people....

http://www.nchv.org/background.cfm
How many homeless veterans are there?

"Although accurate numbers are impossible to come by -- no one keeps
national records on homeless veterans -- the VA estimates that nearly
200,000 veterans are homeless on any given night. And nearly 400,000
experience homelessness over the course of a year. Conservatively, one out
of every three homeless men who is sleeping in a doorway, alley or box in
our cities and rural communities has put on a uniform and served this
country. According to the National Survey of Homeless Assistance Providers
and Clients (U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness and the Urban
Institute, 1999), veterans account for 23% of all homeless people in
America."


hmmmm.... why are the sane solutions always the ones that are
overlooked....?.... oh.... that's right... the capitalist reichtoids who
reserve socialism for the rich have been in charge.... silly me.... ;-)
sdgreen
2008-12-17 01:36:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by klunk
Post by Stephen Green
Post by Roedy Green
There are about 0.2 percent of the population homeless in the USA.
This is about 1 in 500 people.
The burden of caring for the homeless is embarrassingly light. It is
downright undetectable. There is no problem with money. The problem is
mean spirited people who enjoy punishing the homeless.
Further the costs of housing the homeless would be less than what we
do now locking them out in the rain like some besotted parents.
Politicians admit this.
In the entire USA there are about 600,000 homeless people. The cost of
feeding and housing the all of them for a year is $3.6 billion (not
counting the savings from getting them off the streets).
The Iraq war costs $12 billion a month.
the cost of Medicare D is $43 billion a year.
Mr Madoff stole $50 billion. Banks got a $750 billion bailout.
There are trillions (thousands of billions) of dollars "missing" in
the Pentagon accounting ledgers.
"Behold, this was the iniquity of thy sister Sodom, pride, fullness of
bread, and abundance of idleness was in her and in her daughters,
neither did she strengthen the hand of the poor and needy."
~ Ezekiel 16:49
Given than 50% are suffering from some sort of mental illness and that
they should be in some sort of supervised living envoronment, what do you
do with the other 50% whose are generally fit to work?
Problem is even though in the long run providing accommodation may save
money, in the short run given the magnitude of the issue, no simple
solutions are available. Society has thrown billions of dollars to this
problem and yet nothing concrete has been evident.
Some one said some time ago that the best thing is the status quo, since
that guarentees a bunch of jobs for the NGO's forever. The NGO's are all
socialists who have not come up with a solution.
well then... the solution is actually simpler than you might think... and
we can kill two birds with one stone... figuratively speaking of
course.... if we stop pissing away stupid amounts of money in these insane
oil and international meddling wars, the we dramatically reduce the number
of veterans whom actually comprise a significant proportion of homeless
people....
http://www.nchv.org/background.cfm
How many homeless veterans are there?
"Although accurate numbers are impossible to come by -- no one keeps
national records on homeless veterans -- the VA estimates that nearly
200,000 veterans are homeless on any given night. And nearly 400,000
experience homelessness over the course of a year. Conservatively, one out
of every three homeless men who is sleeping in a doorway, alley or box in
our cities and rural communities has put on a uniform and served this
country. According to the National Survey of Homeless Assistance Providers
and Clients (U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness and the Urban
Institute, 1999), veterans account for 23% of all homeless people in
America."
hmmmm.... why are the sane solutions always the ones that are
overlooked....?.... oh.... that's right... the capitalist reichtoids who
reserve socialism for the rich have been in charge.... silly me.... ;-)
That dear Sir is way to simplistic. While I am not too sure those numbers
are valid for Canada's military, the point is that the number of homeless
in Canada are certainly not derived from the forces. It is clear that the
majority are addicts, the mentally impaired (for what ever reason), and of
course those who can be classified as the age old category of Gipsies (who
really don't want to be counted anyway.

We killed the logical by pre-maturely closing down institutions. The ability
to create localized miniature institutions has not and never will be
successful. "Not in my backyard", is the clarion call of many. The creation
of multitiered habitation has also not really worked as envisioned. Even
in 'good times' homelessness is still a problem.

Why? Is society too soft? Is Workfare maybe a solution?

In the old days we used to have those hard done by work for municipalities;
that was mostly killed off by the unions. WE used to have those who were
disabled or mentally reduced do menial tasks; that too was killed by the
Unions. We use to have a sense that society would individually support
those who were disadvantaged, well that was killed off by socialists and
NGO's. Charities used to be a good thing, now they are scams or otherwise
profit centers, and there are too many of them.

The problem is we have piss poor screening processes, lack of logical
resources such as institutions, too much access to drugs and a general
attitude of 'who cares' because there are way, way too many bloody fingers
in the pie.

Just look at the budgets of the various Social Services agencies; scrap off
the admin costs, and we could build all the housing required.

I say get rid of the NGOs, abolish the Social Services Agencies, a band aid
org by any definition, and use the money to do what is necessary. Do
housing, institutions, healthcare, enhance drug enforcement etc.


===
klunk
2008-12-17 04:23:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by sdgreen
Post by klunk
Post by Stephen Green
Post by Roedy Green
There are about 0.2 percent of the population homeless in the USA.
This is about 1 in 500 people.
The burden of caring for the homeless is embarrassingly light. It is
downright undetectable. There is no problem with money. The problem is
mean spirited people who enjoy punishing the homeless.
Further the costs of housing the homeless would be less than what we
do now locking them out in the rain like some besotted parents.
Politicians admit this.
In the entire USA there are about 600,000 homeless people. The cost of
feeding and housing the all of them for a year is $3.6 billion (not
counting the savings from getting them off the streets).
The Iraq war costs $12 billion a month.
the cost of Medicare D is $43 billion a year.
Mr Madoff stole $50 billion. Banks got a $750 billion bailout.
There are trillions (thousands of billions) of dollars "missing" in
the Pentagon accounting ledgers.
"Behold, this was the iniquity of thy sister Sodom, pride, fullness of
bread, and abundance of idleness was in her and in her daughters,
neither did she strengthen the hand of the poor and needy."
~ Ezekiel 16:49
Given than 50% are suffering from some sort of mental illness and that
they should be in some sort of supervised living envoronment, what do you
do with the other 50% whose are generally fit to work?
Problem is even though in the long run providing accommodation may save
money, in the short run given the magnitude of the issue, no simple
solutions are available. Society has thrown billions of dollars to this
problem and yet nothing concrete has been evident.
Some one said some time ago that the best thing is the status quo, since
that guarentees a bunch of jobs for the NGO's forever. The NGO's are all
socialists who have not come up with a solution.
well then... the solution is actually simpler than you might think... and
we can kill two birds with one stone... figuratively speaking of
course.... if we stop pissing away stupid amounts of money in these insane
oil and international meddling wars, the we dramatically reduce the number
of veterans whom actually comprise a significant proportion of homeless
people....
http://www.nchv.org/background.cfm
How many homeless veterans are there?
"Although accurate numbers are impossible to come by -- no one keeps
national records on homeless veterans -- the VA estimates that nearly
200,000 veterans are homeless on any given night. And nearly 400,000
experience homelessness over the course of a year. Conservatively, one out
of every three homeless men who is sleeping in a doorway, alley or box in
our cities and rural communities has put on a uniform and served this
country. According to the National Survey of Homeless Assistance Providers
and Clients (U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness and the Urban
Institute, 1999), veterans account for 23% of all homeless people in
America."
hmmmm.... why are the sane solutions always the ones that are
overlooked....?.... oh.... that's right... the capitalist reichtoids who
reserve socialism for the rich have been in charge.... silly me.... ;-)
That dear Sir is way to simplistic. While I am not too sure those numbers
are valid for Canada's military, the point is that the number of homeless
in Canada are certainly not derived from the forces. It is clear that the
majority are addicts, the mentally impaired (for what ever reason), and of
course those who can be classified as the age old category of Gipsies (who
really don't want to be counted anyway.
We killed the logical by pre-maturely closing down institutions. The ability
to create localized miniature institutions has not and never will be
successful. "Not in my backyard", is the clarion call of many. The creation
of multitiered habitation has also not really worked as envisioned. Even
in 'good times' homelessness is still a problem.
Why? Is society too soft? Is Workfare maybe a solution?
lol... how about you define "too soft"... and try to account for the sheer
lack of humanity inherent within that statement when, or if you do..... ;-)
Post by sdgreen
In the old days we used to have those hard done by work for
municipalities;
that was mostly killed off by the unions. WE used to have those who were
disabled or mentally reduced do menial tasks; that too was killed by the
Unions. We use to have a sense that society would individually support
those who were disadvantaged, well that was killed off by socialists and
NGO's. Charities used to be a good thing, now they are scams or otherwise
profit centers, and there are too many of them.
The problem is we have piss poor screening processes, lack of logical
resources such as institutions, too much access to drugs and a general
attitude of 'who cares' because there are way, way too many bloody fingers
in the pie.
Just look at the budgets of the various Social Services agencies; scrap off
the admin costs, and we could build all the housing required.
I say get rid of the NGOs, abolish the Social Services Agencies, a band aid
org by any definition, and use the money to do what is necessary. Do
housing, institutions, healthcare, enhance drug enforcement etc.
wow sd, you must be what's referred to as a "compassionate conservative"...


http://kurnmeet.blog.ca/2008/11/10/homeless-vets-5010660
"Warriors come back from combat without the proper support"

"Although other countries, including the United States and the United
Kingdom, have programs and special shelters for homeless veterans, advocates
such as retired colonel Patrick Stogran say Canada has ignored the problem."

"It's like leaving someone bleeding on the battlefield," says Stogran, who
is Canada's first ombudsman of Veterans Affairs. "Someone sleeping in their
car can't integrate back into society."

Stogran has visited shelters across the country - from Calgary and Edmonton
to Halifax and Charlottetown. Every single one has served former military
officers, he says. Many won't automatically identify these men and women as
veterans. As Stogran says, they aren't the ones you see in Remembrance Day
ceremonies.

Many of the "walking wounded" are younger men and women who served as
peacekeepers in Bosnia or who have returned from Afghanistan. About 14,000
soldiers have taken part in the Afghanistan mission since it began in 2002.

People are coming back as "stress casualties that have slipped through the
cracks," Stogran says.

"Guys came back with baggage. We may have a decade of lost veterans out
there. Veteran Affairs has not been reaching out to them."

Gary Scammell knows how hard it is to forget. Since he fought in Vietnam at
the age of 20, he has been doing his best to do that.

Forget the memory of being under fire. Forget watching his buddy die by his
side. Forget the chronic fatigue that comes from endless sleepless nights,
jolted awake by the slightest rustle.

Scammell is one of a dozen homeless veterans living at a shelter in Calgary.
He fought for the United States in Vietnam, but is now a Canadian citizen.

--------------


http://www.nationalhomeless.org/publications/facts/veterans.pdf


Approximately 40% of homeless men are veterans, although veterans comprise
only 34% of the
general adult male population. The National Coalition for Homeless Veterans
estimates that on
any given night, 200,000 veterans are homeless, and 400,000 veterans will
experience
homelessness during the course of a year (National Coalition for Homeless
Veterans, 2006). 97%
of those homeless veterans will be male (Department of Veterans Affairs,
2008). The National
Survey of Homeless Assistance Providers and Clients reports that veterans
account for 23% of
all homeless people in America (U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness and
the Urban
Institute, 1999).

Despite the overrepresentation of veterans in the homeless population,
homelessness among
veterans is not clearly related to combat military experience. Rather,
studies show that homeless
veterans appear less likely to have served in combat than housed veterans
(Rosenheck, 1996).
Similarly, despite the widespread perception that Vietnam-era veterans
constitute the majority of
homeless veterans, research indicates that the veterans who are at greatest
risk of homelessness
are those who served during the late Vietnam and post-Vietnam era
(Rosenheck, 1996). These
veterans had little exposure to combat, but appear to have increased rates
of mental illness and
addiction disorders, possibly due to recruitment patterns. Faced with a lack
of affordable
housing, declining job opportunities, and stagnating wages (see "Why are
People Homeless?,"
NCH Fact Sheet #1), people with these disabilities are more vulnerable to
homelessness.
klunk
2008-12-17 05:20:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by sdgreen
Post by klunk
Post by Stephen Green
Post by Roedy Green
There are about 0.2 percent of the population homeless in the USA.
This is about 1 in 500 people.
The burden of caring for the homeless is embarrassingly light. It is
downright undetectable. There is no problem with money. The problem is
mean spirited people who enjoy punishing the homeless.
Further the costs of housing the homeless would be less than what we
do now locking them out in the rain like some besotted parents.
Politicians admit this.
In the entire USA there are about 600,000 homeless people. The cost of
feeding and housing the all of them for a year is $3.6 billion (not
counting the savings from getting them off the streets).
The Iraq war costs $12 billion a month.
the cost of Medicare D is $43 billion a year.
Mr Madoff stole $50 billion. Banks got a $750 billion bailout.
There are trillions (thousands of billions) of dollars "missing" in
the Pentagon accounting ledgers.
"Behold, this was the iniquity of thy sister Sodom, pride, fullness of
bread, and abundance of idleness was in her and in her daughters,
neither did she strengthen the hand of the poor and needy."
~ Ezekiel 16:49
Given than 50% are suffering from some sort of mental illness and that
they should be in some sort of supervised living envoronment, what do you
do with the other 50% whose are generally fit to work?
Problem is even though in the long run providing accommodation may save
money, in the short run given the magnitude of the issue, no simple
solutions are available. Society has thrown billions of dollars to this
problem and yet nothing concrete has been evident.
Some one said some time ago that the best thing is the status quo, since
that guarentees a bunch of jobs for the NGO's forever. The NGO's are all
socialists who have not come up with a solution.
well then... the solution is actually simpler than you might think... and
we can kill two birds with one stone... figuratively speaking of
course.... if we stop pissing away stupid amounts of money in these insane
oil and international meddling wars, the we dramatically reduce the number
of veterans whom actually comprise a significant proportion of homeless
people....
http://www.nchv.org/background.cfm
How many homeless veterans are there?
"Although accurate numbers are impossible to come by -- no one keeps
national records on homeless veterans -- the VA estimates that nearly
200,000 veterans are homeless on any given night. And nearly 400,000
experience homelessness over the course of a year. Conservatively, one out
of every three homeless men who is sleeping in a doorway, alley or box in
our cities and rural communities has put on a uniform and served this
country. According to the National Survey of Homeless Assistance Providers
and Clients (U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness and the Urban
Institute, 1999), veterans account for 23% of all homeless people in
America."
hmmmm.... why are the sane solutions always the ones that are
overlooked....?.... oh.... that's right... the capitalist reichtoids who
reserve socialism for the rich have been in charge.... silly me.... ;-)
That dear Sir is way to simplistic. While I am not too sure those numbers
are valid for Canada's military, the point is that the number of homeless
in Canada are certainly not derived from the forces. It is clear that the
majority are addicts, the mentally impaired (for what ever reason), and of
course those who can be classified as the age old category of Gipsies (who
really don't want to be counted anyway.
We killed the logical by pre-maturely closing down institutions. The ability
to create localized miniature institutions has not and never will be
successful. "Not in my backyard", is the clarion call of many. The creation
of multitiered habitation has also not really worked as envisioned. Even
in 'good times' homelessness is still a problem.
Why? Is society too soft? Is Workfare maybe a solution?
lol... how about you define "too soft"... and try to account for the sheer
lack of humanity inherent within that statement when, or if you do..... ;-)
Post by sdgreen
In the old days we used to have those hard done by work for
municipalities;
that was mostly killed off by the unions. WE used to have those who were
disabled or mentally reduced do menial tasks; that too was killed by the
Unions. We use to have a sense that society would individually support
those who were disadvantaged, well that was killed off by socialists and
NGO's. Charities used to be a good thing, now they are scams or otherwise
profit centers, and there are too many of them.
The problem is we have piss poor screening processes, lack of logical
resources such as institutions, too much access to drugs and a general
attitude of 'who cares' because there are way, way too many bloody fingers
in the pie.
Just look at the budgets of the various Social Services agencies; scrap off
the admin costs, and we could build all the housing required.
I say get rid of the NGOs, abolish the Social Services Agencies, a band aid
org by any definition, and use the money to do what is necessary. Do
housing, institutions, healthcare, enhance drug enforcement etc.
wow sd, you must be what's referred to as a "compassionate conservative"...


http://kurnmeet.blog.ca/2008/11/10/homeless-vets-5010660
"Warriors come back from combat without the proper support"

"Although other countries, including the United States and the United
Kingdom, have programs and special shelters for homeless veterans, advocates
such as retired colonel Patrick Stogran say Canada has ignored the problem."

"It's like leaving someone bleeding on the battlefield," says Stogran, who
is Canada's first ombudsman of Veterans Affairs. "Someone sleeping in their
car can't integrate back into society."

Stogran has visited shelters across the country - from Calgary and Edmonton
to Halifax and Charlottetown. Every single one has served former military
officers, he says. Many won't automatically identify these men and women as
veterans. As Stogran says, they aren't the ones you see in Remembrance Day
ceremonies.

Many of the "walking wounded" are younger men and women who served as
peacekeepers in Bosnia or who have returned from Afghanistan. About 14,000
soldiers have taken part in the Afghanistan mission since it began in 2002.

People are coming back as "stress casualties that have slipped through the
cracks," Stogran says.

"Guys came back with baggage. We may have a decade of lost veterans out
there. Veteran Affairs has not been reaching out to them."

Gary Scammell knows how hard it is to forget. Since he fought in Vietnam at
the age of 20, he has been doing his best to do that.

Forget the memory of being under fire. Forget watching his buddy die by his
side. Forget the chronic fatigue that comes from endless sleepless nights,
jolted awake by the slightest rustle.

Scammell is one of a dozen homeless veterans living at a shelter in Calgary.
He fought for the United States in Vietnam, but is now a Canadian citizen.

--------------


http://www.nationalhomeless.org/publications/facts/veterans.pdf


Approximately 40% of homeless men are veterans, although veterans comprise
only 34% of the
general adult male population. The National Coalition for Homeless Veterans
estimates that on
any given night, 200,000 veterans are homeless, and 400,000 veterans will
experience
homelessness during the course of a year (National Coalition for Homeless
Veterans, 2006). 97%
of those homeless veterans will be male (Department of Veterans Affairs,
2008). The National
Survey of Homeless Assistance Providers and Clients reports that veterans
account for 23% of
all homeless people in America (U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness and
the Urban
Institute, 1999).

Despite the overrepresentation of veterans in the homeless population,
homelessness among
veterans is not clearly related to combat military experience. Rather,
studies show that homeless
veterans appear less likely to have served in combat than housed veterans
(Rosenheck, 1996).
Similarly, despite the widespread perception that Vietnam-era veterans
constitute the majority of
homeless veterans, research indicates that the veterans who are at greatest
risk of homelessness
are those who served during the late Vietnam and post-Vietnam era
(Rosenheck, 1996). These
veterans had little exposure to combat, but appear to have increased rates
of mental illness and
addiction disorders, possibly due to recruitment patterns. Faced with a lack
of affordable
housing, declining job opportunities, and stagnating wages (see "Why are
People Homeless?,"
NCH Fact Sheet #1), people with these disabilities are more vulnerable to
homelessness.

Crap Detector
2008-12-16 15:25:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Roedy Green
There are about 0.2 percent of the population homeless in the USA.
This is about 1 in 500 people.
The burden of caring for the homeless is embarrassingly light. It is
downright undetectable. There is no problem with money. The problem is
mean spirited people who enjoy punishing the homeless.
Further the costs of housing the homeless would be less than what we
do now locking them out in the rain like some besotted parents.
Politicians admit this.
In the entire USA there are about 600,000 homeless people. The cost of
feeding and housing the all of them for a year is $3.6 billion (not
counting the savings from getting them off the streets).
The Iraq war costs $12 billion a month.
the cost of Medicare D is $43 billion a year.
Mr Madoff stole $50 billion.
Banks got a $750 billion bailout.
There are trillions (thousands of billions) of dollars "missing" in
the Pentagon accounting ledgers.
"Behold, this was the iniquity of thy sister Sodom, pride, fullness of
bread, and abundance of idleness was in her and in her daughters,
neither did she strengthen the hand of the poor and needy."
~ Ezekiel 16:49
--
Roedy Green Canadian Mind Products
http://mindprod.com
PM Steven Harper is fixated on the costs of implementing Kyoto, estimated as high as 1% of GDP.
However, he refuses to consider the costs of not implementing Kyoto which the
famous economist Nicholas Stern estimated at 5 to 20% of GDP
A major cause of homelessness is rent controls.-- Thomas Sowell "Basic
Ecomomics"
Canuck57
2008-12-16 15:54:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Crap Detector
Post by Roedy Green
There are about 0.2 percent of the population homeless in the USA.
This is about 1 in 500 people.
The burden of caring for the homeless is embarrassingly light. It is
downright undetectable. There is no problem with money. The problem is
mean spirited people who enjoy punishing the homeless.
Further the costs of housing the homeless would be less than what we
do now locking them out in the rain like some besotted parents.
Politicians admit this.
In the entire USA there are about 600,000 homeless people. The cost of
feeding and housing the all of them for a year is $3.6 billion (not
counting the savings from getting them off the streets).
The Iraq war costs $12 billion a month.
the cost of Medicare D is $43 billion a year.
Mr Madoff stole $50 billion.
Banks got a $750 billion bailout.
There are trillions (thousands of billions) of dollars "missing" in
the Pentagon accounting ledgers.
"Behold, this was the iniquity of thy sister Sodom, pride, fullness of
bread, and abundance of idleness was in her and in her daughters,
neither did she strengthen the hand of the poor and needy."
~ Ezekiel 16:49
--
Roedy Green Canadian Mind Products
http://mindprod.com
PM Steven Harper is fixated on the costs of implementing Kyoto, estimated
as high as 1% of GDP.
However, he refuses to consider the costs of not implementing Kyoto which the
famous economist Nicholas Stern estimated at 5 to 20% of GDP
A major cause of homelessness is rent controls.-- Thomas Sowell "Basic
Ecomomics"
They do work for a very short term. But when demand outstrips capacity it
ultimately ends up in a shortage of places to stay.

No one is going to invest and rent properties where costs are not capped but
revenue is. A sure mix to lose money.
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